Majuro, Marshall Islands

Majuro turned out to be everything we wanted it to be: a laid back place with good food and great beaches. The perfect place to relax. As the fifth least visited country on earth, we also had the beaches completely to ourself and felt very welcome, being about the only tourists there.

Our accomodation for a stay was the house of the first president of Marshall Islands, which now belonged to Joe and Kate, some friendly people we had contacted through couchsurfing. They also cooked us a traditional Pacific dinner one of the evenings. Tuna with coconut, tomato and onion. All fish meals here are fantastic.

There are two big beaches, Rita and Laura, laying of each side of the atoll with about a two hours in between them. Driving between them, or anywhere in Majuro is also nice, seeing the water on each side of the road. The Majuro atoll is like a broken circle, where you can see across to the other side at all time. Not having been on an atoll before, it was just fascinating to see how simple it was with transport: buses (vans) went from Rita to Laura every hour and taxis ran in between. Taxi prices were 1$ per person for shorter ride, and they were shared with others standing along the road. A bit surprising on our first ride, where a random guy just jumped into our taxi from the airport, but quite smart, since there is just one road on the atoll and no street adresses so that everyone have to go the same way.

On our third day we went to Robert Reimers Hotel to order a boat taxi to one of the outer islands. For 30$ per person he took us to Eneko Islands, just half an hour with speed boat where we were all by ourself, except for the two local families living on the other side of the island. In addition to its beautiful nature and welcoming culture, the fact that we were all by ourself was the best part of the Marshall Islands. And for all those traveling there in the future I hope that there is still only expensive monopoly flights serving the destination so that you can get the same experience that we had when visiting the Marshall Islands.